1890s People - 'D'
   
Individual biographies can be accessed either by browsing the alphabetical listings available under each highlighted letter or by using the search function.
 
   

 
Ella D'Arcy
By Ruth Knechtel Ella D’Arcy was born in London in 1851 to Irish parents and educated in Germany and France. Initially, D’Arcy studied to become a visual artist but problems with her eyesight lead her to turn to fiction writing as an alternative. Before her appearance in The Yellow Book’s first volume, D’Arcy had published some of her work in Charles Dickens’s All the Year Round, as well as in Blackwood’s Magazine and Temple Bar.
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John Davidson
By Linda K. Hughes John Davidson is best known for a poem in the July 1894 Yellow Book (Vol. II)— “Thirty Bob a Week.” Its fame partly derives from the warm accolade of T. S. Eliot in the preface to a 1961 selection of Davidson’s poetry.
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Mabel Dearmer
By Diana Maltz The novelist playwright and children’s book illustrator Mabel Dearmer was born Jessie Mabel Pritchard White on March 22, 1872. Her parents were Surgeon Major William White and Selina Taylor (Pritchard) White of Caernarvon, Wales.
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Marion Hepworth Dixon
By Valerie Fehlbaum "The name, of course, [...] the name counts for something," declares an editor in Ella Hepworth Dixon's renowned New Woman novel...
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Ella Hepworth Dixon
By Margaret D. Stetz By the time her sole contribution to The Yellow Book, a short story titled “The Sweet o’ the Year,” appeared in the April 1896 issue, Ella Hepworth Dixon’s major accomplishments as a writer of fiction were already behind her: an episodic comic novel, My Flirtations (1892), and the work of feminist social realism for which she is best known today, The Story of a Modern Woman (1894).
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Ménie Muriel Dowie
By Jad Adams Ménie Muriel Dowie was the epitome of the adventurous modern woman. She was a novelist, a journalist and a cattle-breeder. Despite her strong spirit, Dowie came to grief when she adopted the same relatively lax attitude to sexual morality as did the men in her circle.
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Ernest Dowson
By Jad Adams Ernest Dowson was the purest representative of the movement referred to as the “Decadence.” His life of exquisite verse, classical learning, French travel, dissolution, blighted love and Catholic conversion made him the archetypal 1890s character even before he set the seal on his iconic status with an early death.
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