Bookman

The latest Yellow Book, just issued by
Messrs. Copeland and Day, lays more
serious claim than any of its previous
numbers, perhaps, to our studious at-
tention. The influence of Mr. Henry
James is especially remarkable, as, in-
deed, it always has been on the little
group of contributors. Were it only for
Miss Ella D'Arcy's powerful story,
"The Web of Maya," this number
would be interesting. It is of such an
exceedingly high order of merit as to
confirm our claim to regard her among
the masters of the short story. Mr. Le
Gallienne and Mr. Crackenthorpe are
both at their best, and "The Queen's
Pleasure," by the editor, is as dainty,
fascinating, and peculiar in its qual-
ity as is all his work. The "Yellow
Dwarf" is generally supposed to be
Mr. Harland himself. His outspoken
criticism and literary preferences are
rather amusing, but they run counter
to the judgment of the great body of
readers, which is, in the long run, trust-
worthy and a sure touchstone.





MLA citation: Rev. of The Yellow Book 7. Bookman January 1896: 372-3. The Yellow Nineties Online. Ed. Dennis Denisoff and Lorraine Janzen Kooistra. Ryerson University, 2010. Web. [Date of access]. http://1890s.ca/HTML.aspx?s=review_v7_bookman_jan_1896.html